One-Month Reflection on the Today Project

A month into my writing project for the year, and feedback from a limited number of friends and family has been positive (thanks!), though the words “melancholy” and “forced” have come up.

Of course it’s forced. The whole goal is to use the fewest and best words to convey an accurate description of what I see. These nuggets don’t exactly trip off the tongue without serious editing. If what I see requires lots of hyphens and adjectives, well, it’s my perspective. (How po-mo is that. yawn.) But perhaps after more practice, I’ll find a rhythm that isn’t so strained.

If the opposite of forced is to convey the natural, narrative arc of my day, then I will not indulge. Who cares about the time I got a cup of coffee for my morning migraine, or when my kid had a snotty nose, and I ran over a stray kitten, watched the game with those people, you know, and where I heard about the besnotch that’s going out with my ex, but I can’t think of anything to write, so I’ll just go to sleep after this thoughtful post (insert spelling errors). Besides, it’s nobody’s business whether the kitten lived or died.

The melancholy isn’t intentional, but it’s been a grey winter. I’m usually a contented person. Except when I feel snarky.

On the fourth day, and every day thereafter, I wanted to write about how difficult / boring it is to compose something regularly.

On the fifth day, I was daunted (and then bored) by the thought of doing 360 more posts about what I see in three sentences or less.

On the sixth day, I bribed myself to continue with the idea that I could do something different in February. Haiku? Cinquain?

On the 30th or whatever day, I’ve resolved to keep with the three sentences. And to try to inhabit the middle of a Venn diagram that consists of Bob Dylan, Neil Young and Leonard Cohen. I could get to March in worse company.

Note to self: Don’t write about angels, even if they are snow angels. It’s embarrassing.