Ginger and The Skipper in the Crescent City, Part 2: 15-16 August 2013

Back to town for lunch at Crescent Pie & Sausage Company, which received an A+ from boudinlink.com. Must. Have. Boudin. A college friend from Sulphur got me hooked on this rice-and-pork sausage in a snappy casing. The Crescent Pie boudin (with pickle on the side) was indeed A+. The meat was more pasty than crumbly with a good ratio of rice (cooked through), and the seasoning wasn’t too heavy or salty. It exploded slightly when cut, but held together for the most part. The Skipper and I each had small bowls of the jambalaya with black eyed peas – a nice touch. He also ordered the seafood pie, more pie than seafood, but the crust looked good. This, too, would be a regular stop if we lived here.

Next up: family history. In the summer of 1944, my paternal grandparents moved to New Orleans right after they were married, while my grandfather prepared to attend Tulane. Someone saved the letters that my grandmother wrote home almost daily, so we found the address in Marlyville-Fontainebleu. The house was still there, in good shape, and it is still a student neighborhood. It was easy to see my grandmother as a new bride taking the bus to go shopping and hanging laundry in the back yard. The war was on, and her letters made New Orleans sound like a boom town with sailors everywhere. She had never lived any place besides Arkansas.

We cruised Tulane, Audubon Park, and the Upper and Lower Garden districts before racing back to the Hilton to drop off the car. The sterile, high-rise hotels by the convention center could have been in any city, and we were glad for our time in Fauborg-Marigny. After a short rest, we met friends for dinner at Cochon (reservation a good idea for the restaurant, not the deli).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s